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Board Meetings

Board meetings are hybrid and held on the first Tuesday of each month in-person at the Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St., and online via Google Meet.

Link: meet.google.com/tpp-wnhk-cia Or Join By Phone:(US) +1 413-931-1378 PIN: ‪223 845 764#

Meetings are open to all, and a public comment period (3 minute limit/comment) is included on the agenda at the beginning of each meeting.

Current & Past Meeting Times & Agendas

SEN Hybrid Board Meeting Agenda, 7pm May 14, 2024

Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St. & Google Meet

Link: meet.google.com/tpp-wnhk-cia

Or Join By Phone:

(US) +1 413-931-1378 PIN: 223 845 764#

 

Call to Order & Welcome

Public Comment (3 mins/comment)

Welcome & SEN Committee Summaries: Jessica (10 mins)

Introduction of Board Candidates: Dennis (10 mins)

Introduction to Online/In-Person Voting Process: Jess/Dennis (<5 mins)

  • Voting (10 mins)
  • Voting Results (2 mins)

SEN Board Enters Executive Session

  • Officer Selection

For the Public During the Executive Session & Remainder of Meeting:

  • SEN Community Social Event featuring live music, light snacks, and SEN Get-to-Know-Your-Neighbor Bingo with a chance to win $25 gift cards from Hideaway Bakery and Provisions South

SEN Board Exits Executive Session

  • Announcement of new board officers (<1min)
  • Membership ratification of new board officers (<1 min)

Adjourn (8:30pm)

SEN Hybrid Board Meeting Agenda, 7pm May 7, 2024

Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St. & Google Meet

Link: meet.google.com/tpp-wnhk-cia

Or Join By Phone:

(US) +1 413-931-1378 PIN: 223 845 764#

Call to Order

  • Personal video and audio recordings may not be reproduced in any form without informed consent of the individuals represented ie: non-board members of the audience.
  • Public Comment (3 mins/comment)
    • If a member of the online audience wishes to make public comment, please raise a hand.

Message from Co-Chairs: (5 mins) So long and thanks for all the fish… 😉

Consent Agenda (see additional documents) (<3 mins)

  1. Approve Past Meeting Minutes
  2. Approve May 14th Board Election Meeting Agenda for the May14th

Treasurer’s Report: Dennis (see email report)

Committee Reports (see email repohrts unless otherwise noted below)

  • Disaster Preparedness:                              Dennis/Heather
  • Transportation Committee:                         Lucy
  • Communications Committee:                      Dennis, Ela, Lynne
  • Tugman Park Volunteers:                           John
  • Environmental Stewardship Committee:       Devon
  • NLC:                                                        Dennis

Old Business:

  • May Election Meeting Update (10-15 mins)
    • Order of Operations
    • Social Event Update: Ela & Dennis
      • Music
      • Bingo
  • Reminder: Board/Committee Member Roles:
    • Front Sign-in Table: Lucy, Jessica
    • Online Voting/Google Meet: Jess
    • In-person Voting: Dennis & Lynne
    • Social Event Facilitators (while executive position voting occurs): Jess & Gerry
  • June 4, 2024 Board Retreat Update: Lucy, Jessica, John (5-10 mins)

New Business:

  • SEN Mailchimp (5 mins)
    • Election & Social
  • Next Neighborhood Meet Up? (5 mins)
  • Addressing lack of a ‘Human Rights Committee’ (10-15 mins)
    • Purpose/Need?
    • Alternatives to an actual standing committee
    • Board member bandwidth for current committees
    • Plans for moving forward

Adjourn

SEN Hybrid Board Meeting Agenda, 7pm April 9, 2024

Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St. & Google Meet

Link: meet.google.com/tpp-wnhk-cia

Or Join By Phone:

(US) +1 413-931-1378 PIN: 223 845 764#

Call to Order

  • Personal video and audio recordings may not be reproduced in any form without informed consent of the individuals represented ie: non-board members of the audience.
  • Public Comment (5 mins)
    • If a member of the online audience wishes to make public comment, please raise a hand.

Message from Co-Chairs: (5 mins)

Consent Agenda (see additional documents) (<3 mins)

  1. Approve Past Meeting Minutes
  2. Approve the following changes for general, election, and picnic schedule for 2025 and beyond:
    • February: Election
    • March: Retreat
    • May: General
    • September: Picnic
    • November: General

Treasurer’s Report: Dennis (see email report)

Committee Reports (see email reports unless otherwise noted below)

  • Disaster Preparedness:                              Dennis/Heather
  • Transportation Committee:                         Lucy
  • Communications Committee:                      Dennis, Ela, Lynne
  • Tugman Park Volunteers:                           John
  • Environmental Stewardship Committee:       Devon
  • NLC:                                                        Dennis

Old Business:

  • Reminder: Neighborhood Meet Up: April 18th, 10am Hideaway Bakery (same time as the ESC Meeting) (1 min)
  • Picnic Committee (10 mins)
    • Music
    • Date
    • Other?
  • May Election Meeting Update (15-20 mins)
    • Getting the word out: what we have done so far and what do we need/want to do
    • Social Event Update: Ela & Dennis
      • Music
      • Bingo
      • Board/Committee Member Roles?
    • Reminder: Board/Committee Member Roles:
      • Front Sign-in Table:             Lucy, Jessica
      • Online Voting/Google Meet: Jess
      • In-person Voting:                Dennis & Lynne
  • June 4, 2024 Board Retreat: Lucy, Jessica, John (5-10 mins)
    • Ideas:
    • 2025 Work Plan
    • Bob’s Rules Refresher
    • By-Laws/Charter Review
    • Communication Protocols (FB, Word Press, Public Comment, etc.)
    • Google Meet Primer, Google Drive, Word Press Primer?
    • Designated Gmail Set-Up

New Business:

  • Google Meet (5-15 mins)
    • Review & Questions?
    • For detailed instructions about how to switch from Zoom to Google Meet:Switch to Google Meet
  • Work Plan Template/Example (5 mins)
    • Please Review on Shared Google Drive: NA Work Plan Template 2024
    • Due date for the 2024 Work Plan: June 1
    • I will compile the 2024 Work Plan
      • Organized by committees instead of Neighborhood Survey Goals
      • By May 1st: Each committee (including the Picnic) must email me:
        • Committee Work Plan
        • Any Planned Committee Events
        • Any Estimated Costs for Planned Events (if events are free, no worries but please state as such)
      • 2025 Work Plan Draft Created at June 4 Board Retreat
  • SEN Mailchimp (5 mins)
    • Election & Social
    • Neighborhood Meet Up

Adjourn

SEN Hybrid General Meeting Agenda, 7pm March 12, 2024

Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St. & Zoom

Zoom Link:

https://us06web.zoom.us/j/88574713250

 

Call to Order

  • The Board is no longer recording meetings until the City of Eugene changes the online meeting platform and digital storage options soon.
  • Personal video and audio recordings may not be reproduced in any form without informed consent of the individuals represented ie: non-board members of the audience.
  • If a member of the online audience wishes to make public comment, please raise a hand.

Public Comment (3 mins/Comment)

Welcome and Introduction to the SEN General Meeting:

Board Member John Ostrom (5 mins)

  • Call for new Board & Committee members!
  • Five open Board seats for the May election, two of which have incumbent candidates
  • Active Committees: Environmental Stewardship; Friends of Tugman Park; Ready Southeast; Transportation

Board Member Gerry Meenaghan (5 mins)

  • Introduction to Eugene Citizens United for Better Sidewalks

Disaster Preparedness Guest Speakers

-Wildfire Prevention: Bart Johnson, U of O Professor Emeritus of Landscape Architecture (30 mins total)

15 minute presentation followed by 15 minutes of Q & A

-Fuel Reduction Around House & Home: Kate Johns, Western Lane Oregon Department of Forestry (30 mins total)

15 minute presentation followed by 15 minutes of Q & A

Adjourn (8:30pm)

SEN Hybrid Board Meeting Agenda, 7pm March 5, 2024

Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St. & Zoom

Zoom Link:

https://us06web.zoom.us/j/88574713250

 

Call to Order

  • The Board is no longer recording meetings until the City of Eugene transitions the online meeting platform to Google Meets in early 2024.
  • Personal video and audio recordings may not be reproduced in any form without informed consent of the individuals represented ie: non-board members of the audience.
  • If a member of the online audience wishes to make public comment, please raise a hand.

Public Comment (3 mins/comment)

Message from Co-Chairs: (<2 mins) NOTE: April meeting date has changed to Tuesday April 9th, 2024

Ward 2 Update: Councilor Matt Keating (5 mins)

Consent Agenda (see additional documents) (<3 mins)

  1. Approve Past Meeting Minutes
  2. Approve March General Meeting Agenda (see attached)
  3. Approve request from Tugman Tuggers to apply to OECE for materials reimbursement; request follows:

“I (John Ostrom) hereby request that The Friends of Tugman, an active SEN Committee, initiate a funding request from OECE (Office of Equity and Community Engagement) for the purpose of reimbursement of a committee member who recently purchased a 12.5’ x 432’ (600 sq. yards.) roll of woven stabilization fabric from H.D. Fowler Company in Eugene. The cost of this roll is $400. If full reimbursement is not possible, then partial reimbursement will be pursued. This roll of fabric will be used in the Friends of Tugman’s ongoing wet prairie restoration project in the north end of Tugman Park. The fabric is used to tarp over prepared ground that will eventually be planted back with native plant species appropriate to a wet prairie habitat. The fabric tarping helps to kill off the existing vegetation, mainly composed of non-native and invasive grasses and forbs, thereby allowing a more suitable environment for newly planted native species to better survive and spread. These plots may need to be tarped over for 1-2 yrs.”

Treasurer’s Report: Dennis (see email report)

Committee Reports (see email reports unless otherwise noted below)

  • Disaster Preparedness – John Q
  • Transportation Committee – Jess
  • Communications Committee/Website/FB – Dennis, Ela
  • Tugman Park Volunteers – John
  • Environmental Stewardship Committee – Devon
  • NLC – Dennis

May Election Update: (15-20 mins) mailchimp; paper flyers; neighbor canvasing; post card

  • Reaching out to community members follow-up:
    • Liz -Lucy
    • Colin -Devon
    • School Newsletter Flyers -Jessica/Gerry
    • Neighbor canvasing -Lucy
    • Mailchimp/Postcard -Dennis/Ela/Lynne
  • Social Event Update?
    • Communications Committee: create a proposal for Cindy Kohler for the social event portion. There are funds available. This should be completed and emailed to Cindy as soon as possible.
  • Board/Committee Member Roles:
    • Front sign-in table
    • Online Voting
    • Zoom/Google Meets
    • In-person Voting
    • Social Event Roles?
    • Other?

Old Business:

  • General Meeting Update:(15 mins)
  • March General Meeting
    • Ready Southeast Speakers (Dennis)
    • Board/Committee Member Roles:
      • Plug for joining the board/call for getting the word out?
      • Front sign-in table
      • Introduction of Speakers
      • Zoom
      • Other?
    • Picnic Committee? (5 mins)
      • Call out to neighborhood from the PC for picnic recruiting
    • New General Meeting/Annual Retreat Schedule for 2025 Summary (10 mins)
      • Potentially vote at the April Meeting?
      • February: Election Meeting
      • March: Retreat
      • May: General Meeting
      • September: Picnic
      • November: General Meeting
    • Neighborhood Meet-Ups (5 mins)
      • Thursday, March 21, 5:00pm at Provisions South
      • Next?
      • Ways to generate Board engagement/recruitment?

New Business:

  • SEN Mailchimp (5 mins)
  • 2024: June 04, Retreat (5-10 mins)
    • Orientation for recently elected and existing Board Members
    • Committee Planning
    • And?

Adjourn

SEN Hybrid Board Meeting Agenda, 7pm February 6, 2024
Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St. & Zoom

Zoom Link:

https://us06web.zoom.us/j/88574713250

Call to Order
• The Board is no longer recording meetings until the City of Eugene transitions
the online meeting platform to Google Meets in early 2024.
• Personal video and audio recordings may not be reproduced in any form
without informed consent of the individuals represented ie: non-board
members of the audience.
• If a member of the online audience wishes to make public comment, please
raise a hand.
Public Comment (5 mins)
Message from the Co-Chair: NORP/Model Charter (5 mins)
Consent Agenda (see additional documents) (<3 mins)

1. Approve Past Meeting Minutes
Guest Presentation: (15 min including Q & A)
Ellen Meyi-Galloway and Laura Hammond from the COE Planning and
Development Department, Community Development Division will discuss the City’s
Land Acquisition for Affordable Housing program and provide an overview of a
potential Affordable Housing site at 34th and Hilyard including the research that is underway on that site.
Treasurer’s Report: Dennis (see email report)
Committee Reports (see email reports unless otherwise noted below)
• Disaster Preparedness – John Q
• Transportation Committee – Jess
• Communications Committee/Website/FB – Dennis, Ela
• Tugman Park Volunteers – John
• Environmental Stewardship Committee – Devon
• NLC – Dennis
• May Election Preparation Update: mailchimp; paper flyers; neighbor canvasing; post card
o Reaching out to community members, Liz & Colin, who offered to help with the process?

2. Old Business:
• General Meeting Reminders/Updates (10 mins)
o March: Ready Southeast Update
o May: Election & Social Update/Plan
▪ Up for election:
• Devon
• Gerry
• Jess
• John
• Plus one open At-Large Positions (Christina’s seat)

o November: Transportation Committee Plan?

• Discuss proposed changes to General Meeting dates for 2025: (15-20 mins)
o Election Meeting: change from May to November
o March & May meetings are close too close together; options:

▪ March stays, move May to June
▪ May stays, move March to February
▪ Or?

• Reinstating Meet-ups with a recruitment spin? (5 mins)
New Business:
• June Retreat? (10 mins)
• March Dinner Meeting? (5-10 mins)
• SEN Mailchimp (5 mins)
Adjourn

SEN Hybrid Board Meeting Agenda, 7pm January 9, 2024

Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St. & Zoom

Zoom Link:

https://us06web.zoom.us/j/88574713250

 

Call to Order

  • The Board is no longer recording meetings until the City of Eugene changes the online meeting platform and digital storage options late 2023 early 2024
  • Personal video and audio recordings may not be reproduced in any form without informed consent of the individuals represented ie: non-board members of the audience.
  • If a member of the online audience wishes to make public comment, please raise a hand.

Public Comment (5 mins)

Message from Co-Chairs: (5 mins)

  • Liaisons/Committee Chairs: Please post your respective mission statements on the top of your committee page on the SEN website. If you need help executing, let me know.
  • The new draft NORP & model charter are OUT!!! More to follow…

Consent Agenda (see additional documents) (<3 mins)

  1. Approve Past Meeting Minutes
  2. Approve General Meeting Hosts & Topics
    • March: Ready Southeast (two speakers)
    • May: Communications Committee (election + party!)
    • November: Transportation Committee (two speakers)
  3. Approve Dennis Hebert as Treasurer

Treasurer’s Report: Christina/Dennis (see email report)

            Thank You & Farewell to Christina (2 mins)

Committee Reports (see email reports unless otherwise noted below)

  • Disaster Preparedness – John Q
  • Transportation Committee – Jess
  • Communications Committee – Dennis, Ela
    • FB/Insta/Website/Mailchimp Protocol Update
  • Tugman Park Volunteers – John
  • Environmental Stewardship Committee – Devon
  • NLC – Dennis

Old Business:

  • Pros/Cons of First Annual Board Retreat (15 mins)

New Business:

  • Election Committee Time! Only three meetings left until the elections! (5 mins)
  • Picnic Committee—earlier? YES! Establish Picnic Committee by the March or April Board meeting (5 mins)

 

  • Discuss proposed changes to General Meeting dates for 2025: (15 mins)
    1. Election Meeting: change from May to November
    2. March & May meetings are close too close together; options:
      • March stays, move May to June
      • May stays, move March to February
      • Or?
  • Discuss Optional Board Bios/Pics on SEN Website (5-10 mins)
  • Off Election Schedule Open Board Position; know anyone?

Adjourn

SEN Hybrid Board Meeting Agenda, 7pm November 14, 2023

Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St. & Zoom

Zoom Link: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/88574713250

 Call to Order

  • The Board is no longer recording meetings until the City of Eugene changes the online meeting platform and digital storage options late 2023 early 2024
  • Personal video and audio recordings may not be reproduced in any form without informed consent of the individuals represented ie: non-board members of the audience.
  • If a member of the online audience wishes to make public comment, please raise a hand.

Public Comment (5 mins)

Welcome and Introduction to the SEN General Meeting (2 mins)

Guest Speaker (Introduction by Ward 2 City Councilor, Matt Keating):

-Oregon State Representative Charlie Conrad (30 mins total)

District 12: Eastern Lane County

15 minute presentation followed by 15 minutes of Q & A

Guest Speakers From Lane Transit District:

-Board Member, Heather Murphy; Chief Marketing Officer, Pat Walsh; Director of Planning and Development, Tom Schwetz (30 mins total)

15 minute presentation followed by 15 minutes of Q & A

Adjourn

SEN Hybrid Board Meeting Agenda, 7pm November 7, 2023

Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St. & Zoom

Zoom Link: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/88574713250

 

Call to Order

  • The Board is no longer recording meetings until the City of Eugene changes the online meeting platform and digital storage options late 2023 early 2024
  • Personal video and audio recordings may not be reproduced in any form without informed consent of the individuals represented ie: non-board members of the audience.
  • If a member of the online audience wishes to make public comment, please raise a hand.

Public Comment (5 mins)

Message from Co-Chairs: (5 mins)

Consent Agenda (see additional documents) (<3 mins)

  1. Approve Past Meeting Minutes
  2. Approve ESC Articles to Post
    1. 2023 Oregon State Plastics Legislation Summary; Recycling Modernization Act Summary
  3. Approve General Meeting Agenda
  4. Approve Board Succession Planning Meeting Agenda

Treasurer’s Report: Christina (see email report)

Committee Reports (see email reports unless otherwise noted below)

  • Disaster Preparedness – John Q
  • Transportation Committee – Jess
  • Communications Committee/Website/FB – Dennis, Ela
  • Tugman Park Volunteers – John
  • Environmental Stewardship Committee – Devon
  • NLC – Dennis

Old Business:

  • General Meeting Agenda Summary
    • Define/Confirm Roles and Responsibilities (30 mins)
  • SEN Website Update?
    • Gerry’s COE Contact list needs to be posted
  • December 5 Retreat:
    • All Committee liaisons/chairs: please invite and email the Retreat Agenda to all committee members (all committee members are strongly encouraged to attend)
    • Please send a rough attendee account to me by November 27

New Business:

  • SEN Mailchimp (5 mins)

Adjourn

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SEN Board Meeting Agenda, 7pm October 3, 2023 

**Please Note: This Month’s Meeting is Via Zoom Only**

***(not in-person)***

Zoom Link: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/88574713250 

Call to Order 

  • The Board is no longer recording meetings until the City of Eugene changes the online meeting platform and digital storage options late 2023 early 2024. 
  • Personal video and audio recordings may not be reproduced in any form without informed consent of the individuals represented ie: non-board members of the audience. 
  • If a member of the online audience wishes to make public comment, please raise a hand. 

Public Comment (5 mins) 

Message from Co-Chairs: (5 mins) 

    • Co-Chair Rotations Needed: November-January? 
    • February-April? 
    • May—Two new Co-Chairs needed as I am stepping down 
    • Rotating Co-Chair Duties: Pick up & drop off OWL before/after meetings (OECE office, 1st Floor Downtown LCC Building) 
    • Run Zoom portion of meetings 

Consent Agenda (if applicable, see additional documents) (<3 mins) 

  1. Approve Past Meeting Minutes 
  2. Approve Informational Write-Ups to be posted by the ESC Leave the Leaves 

Treasurer’s Report: Christina (see email report) 

Committee Reports (see email reports unless otherwise noted below) 

  1. Disaster Preparedness – John Q 
  2. Transportation Committee – Jess 
  3. Communications Committee/Website/FB – Dennis, Ela 
  4. Tugman Park Volunteers – John 
  5. Environmental Stewardship Committee – Devon 
  6. NLC – Dennis 

Old Business: 

  • Picnic Committee Debrief (15 mins) See attached report. Note: please email the Picnic Committee with any picnic detailed feedback as there will not be time for a discussion at this meeting. 
  • November General Meeting, November 14th (15 mins) General meeting agenda must be solidified by October 17th (approved at the November 3rd Board meeting)
    • Rep. Charlie Conrad (15 min Legislative Action Summary + 15 min Q & A Session) -Devon is organizing Other topics for Rep Conrad? 
    • Jameson Auten (GM LTD; 15 min presentation + 15 min Q & A) -Jess is organizing
  • Newsletter content due (including General meeting topics/speakers) to Lynne October 17th
    • Who is submitting articles? ESC: Leave the Leaves from the Xerxes Society (see attached)
  • John Q.: Explanation of Creative Commons License (5 mins) Followed by Board Q & A (10 mins) 
  • Prior to the Board meeting, please read: https://creativecommons.org/about/cclicenses/ 

New Business: 

  • First Annual SEN Board Retreat: (10 mins) December 5th, 2023 (normal Board meeting time) 
    • All Board members and SEN Board Committee members are invited to attend (in-person attendance is strongly encouraged) 
    • Café Yum Dinner will be provided & Dessert Potluck is encouraged 
    • Retreat will last two hours; currently scheduled for 7-9pm (arrive at least 15 minutes early to prepare a plate) ▪ Does the Board prefer a 6 or 6:30pm start time? 
    • Lucy & Devon are creating an agenda with Cindy Koehler (look for details in your email after the General Meeting) 
  • SEN Mailchimp (5 mins) 

Adjourn 

 

Leave The Leaves! 

By Justin Wheeler on 6. October 2017 

One of the most valuable things you can do to support pollinators and other invertebrates is to provide them with the winter cover they need. 

Besides providing the right plants, and protecting your garden from pesticides, one of the next most valuable things you can do to support pollinators and other invertebrates is to provide them with the winter cover they need in 

the form of fall leaves and standing dead plant material. Frequently however, this is the hardest pill for gardeners to swallow. 

It may be habitual, a matter of social conditioning, or a holdover of outdated gardening practices from yesteryear— but for whatever reason, we just can’t seem to help ourselves from wanting to tidy up the garden at the end of the season—raking, mowing, and blowing away a bit of nature that is essential to the survival of moths, butterflies, snails, spiders, and dozens of arthropods. 

That’s why this year—and every year—we are making the case for leaving the leaves and offering input on what to do with them. Read on! 4 

Must Love Leaves 

While monarch migration is a well-known phenomenon, it’s not the norm when it comes to butterflies. In fact, the vast majority of butterflies and moths overwinter in the landscape as an egg, caterpillar, chrysalis, or adult. In all but the warmest climates, these butterflies use leaf litter for winter cover. Great spangled fritillary and wooly bear caterpillars tuck themselves into a pile of leaves for protection from cold weather and predators. Red-banded hairstreaks lay their eggs on fallen oak leaves, which become the first food of the caterpillars when they emerge. Luna moths and swallowtail butterflies disguise their cocoons and chrysalises as dried leaves, blending in with the “real” leaves. There are many such examples. 

The red-banded hairstreak is one of many butterflies that depend upon leaf litter as part of their life cycle. (Photo: John Flannery / Flickr) 

Beyond butterflies, bumble bees also rely on leaf litter for protection. At the end of summer, mated queen bumble bees burrow only an inch or two into the earth to hibernate for winter. An extra thick layer of leaves is welcome protection from the elements. There are so many animals that live in leaves: spiders, snails, worms, beetles, millipedes, mites, and more—that support the chipmunks, turtles, birds, and amphibians that rely on these insects for food. 

It’s easy to see how important leaves really are to sustaining the natural web of life. 

Leaves and Lawn 

According to a 2005 NASA estimate, there are around 40 million acres of lawn in the continental United States – making turf grass the single largest “crop” we grow. This disproportionate ratio of lawn to garden is the main reason we rake, mow, and blow. To mimic the natural ecosystem an animal needs, a layer of leaves needs to be at least a couple of inches thick. While this would be too much of a good thing for turf grass to handle—research has shown that lawns actually benefit from a thin layer of leaves, and the rest can be piled up around ornamental trees, shrubs, and perennials to no ill effect. 5 

If you must keep your lawn clear of leaves—try opting for raking or using a leaf vacuum to capture whole leaves, rather than shredding them with a mower and make a leaf pile in a corner of your yard. More on that below. 

Better still would be to reduce your overall lawn footprint, replacing it instead with wildlife-supporting plantings that can be future repositories for fall leaves. 

This suburban landscape features perennials and ground cover that support wildlife and require no mowing or raking. 

(Photo: Xerces Society / Matthew Shepherd) 

To Shred or Not to Shred 

Many organic gardeners opt for shredding their fall leaves for use in compost piles. While this is certainly a more environmentally friendly practice than bagging leaves and sending them to the landfill—shredded leaves will not provide the same cover as leaving them whole, and you may be destroying eggs, caterpillars, and chrysalis along with the leaves. We suggest that leaves in garden beds and lawn edges be left whole. Where space allows, consider creating a leaf pile and allowing it to break down naturally, or add the leaves gradually to your compost pile over time. Such efforts will keep critters safe and allow you to benefit from the rich garden gift that falls from the trees above. 

Free Mulch! 

Another reason to leave the leaves is for the many benefits they provide to your landscape. Leaves provide valuable organic matter and build up healthy soil. Fallen leaves have the same weed suppression and moisture retention properties of shredded wood mulch—and they’re free! Where mulch is desired as a decorative 6 

element, what could be more seasonally appropriate than a pile of brightly-colored fall leaves? 

Fallen leaves have all the properties and benefits of expensive wood mulch—and they’re free! (Photo: Xerces Society / Justin Wheeler) 

The Bottom Line 

You gave them flowers and a place to nest. You tended your garden and avoided pesticides. Don’t carry all of that hard work out to the curb. Simply put, when we treat leaves like trash—we’re tossing out the beautiful moths and butterflies that we’ll surely miss and work so very hard to attract. 

While the idea is to “leave the leaves” permanently—for all of the benefits mentioned above—if you do decide you need to cleanup the garden and remove the leaves in spring, make sure you wait until late in the season so as not to destroy all the life you’ve worked to protect. 

In the past gardeners may have worried that fall leaves, matted down by snow or rain, would have a negative impact on their perennials. In reality, a thick layer of leaves provides additional insulation against bitter cold weather, and can protect newly planted perennials when frost-heave may expose tender roots. Anyone who has spotted fragile spring ephemerals popping up in the woods knows that all but the frailest of plants will burst through the leaf litter in spring without trouble. 

Further Reading 

Read a more recent blog about Leave the Leaves to Benefit Wildlife 

Learn more about Nesting & Overwintering Habitat for pollinators and other beneficial insects Wondering what to do in spring? Don’t spring into garden cleanup too soon! 

Spread the Word! 7 

We’ve created these graphics to help spread the word—leave the leaves, the animals need them. Feel free to share these on social media with the hashtag #leavetheleaves! 8 

SEN Picnic Committee 

September 2023 Report 

The SEN Picnic Committee is an ad-hoc committee that meets approximately 3 months of the year, from June to September, in order to facilitate, plan, organize and produce SEN’s Annual Picnic. The picnic is typically held in early September each year and includes exhibitor booths, food trucks, games, and live entertainment for all of the SEN neighbors, friends and the community at large. 

The current committee consists of 3 SEN board members and an SEN resident. 

The committee met in person on September 19th. The SEN Annual Picnic occurred on September 9th. This final report, all meeting minutes and a shared spreadsheet with exhibitor/donors/entertainment can be found on the SEN Board Google Drive, under the Annual Picnic folder. 

We discussed the following: 

Picnic: The picnic was a success thanks to the support and efforts of the SEN Board, the exhibitors, entertainers, and food trucks. 

Financial: The silent auction made a total of $886.00. 

Feedback: We requested feedback from all of the exhibitors, food trucks, entertainers, silent auction donors, and the picnic committee. We received comments from a food vendor and several exhibitors. The feedback was positive, and should next year’s committee decide to put on a picnic similar in size and scope to this year’s, it would be helpful to review. The specific feedback from them and the picnic committee itself can be found in the 9/19/23 SEN Picnic Committee meeting notes on the SEN Board Google Drive. 

SEN Hybrid Board Meeting Agenda, 7pm, September 5, 2023

Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St. & Zoom

Zoom Link:

https://us06web.zoom.us/j/88574713250

 

Call to Order

  • As a reminder, this meeting will be recorded, personal audio and video are permitted but only with prior disclosure to meeting attendees. Personal video and audio recordings may not be reproduced in any form without informed consent of the individuals represented ie: non-board members of the audience.
  • If a member of the online audience wishes to make public comment, please raise a hand.

Public Comment (5 mins)

Message from Co-Chairs: (none)

Consent Agenda (see additional documents if appropriate) (<3 mins)

  1. Approve Past Meeting Minutes

Treasurer’s Report: Christina (see email report)

Committee Reports (see email reports unless otherwise noted below)

  • Disaster Preparedness – John Q
  • Transportation Committee – Jess
  • Communications Committee/Website/FB – Dennis, Ela
  • Tugman Park Volunteers – John
  • Environmental Stewardship Committee – Devon (nothing to report)
  • NLC – Dennis

Old Business:

  • Picnic Committee Final Report (15-20 mins)

New Business:

  • Discussion of request from John Q regarding the Creative Commons License and whether or not it is needed for SEN distributed materials (the vast majority of which is not original content). (15 mins max)
  • Some additional information can be found here: https://creativecommons.org/about/cclicenses/
  • Key point: “You must own or control copyright in the work. Only the copyright holder or someone with express permission from the copyright holder can apply a CC license or CC0 to a copyrighted work. If you created a work in the scope of your job, you may not be the holder of the copyright.”
  • SEN Mailchimp (5 mins)

Adjourn

SEN Hybrid Board Meeting Agenda, 7pm Tuesday, August 1st, 2023

Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St. & Zoom

Zoom Link:

https://us06web.zoom.us/j/88574713250

 Call to Order

  • As a reminder, this meeting will be recorded, personal audio and video are permitted but only with prior disclosure to meeting attendees. Personal video and audio recordings may not be reproduced in any form without informed consent of the individuals represented ie: non-board members of the audience.
  • If a member of the online audience wishes to make public comment, please raise a hand.

Public Comment (5 mins)

Message from Co-Chairs:

Please note that the official SEN email address (soeast.eug@gmail.com) is for general communications outside of the Board. Please refrain from using this email for Board communications; email SEN Board and Committee members directly at their preferred email addresses (these can be found on the google drive) (<1 min)

Consent Agenda (see additional documents) (<3 mins)

  1. Approve Past Meeting Minutes

Treasurer’s Report: Christina (see email report & new allocation report from Cindy Koehler)

Committee Reports (see email reports unless otherwise noted below)

  • Disaster Preparedness – John Q
  • Transportation Committee – Jess
  • Communications Committee/Website/FB – Dennis, Ela
  • Tugman Park Volunteers – John
  • Environmental Stewardship Committee – Devon
  • NLC – Gerry

Old Business:

  • Volunteer for Board Retreat this Fall (10 mins)
    • Assist me & Cindy Kohler to plan a Board retreat (potentially 3 zoom meetings?) (the City will be doing most of the work)
      • Board Member Training 101
      • 2024 Goal Setting/Plan of Work

New Business:

  • SEN Website Updates: Submit all ideas via email (no brainstorming now please) to the Communications Committee by August 15th (2 mins)
  • Post Card/One Pager (depending on amount of content) for SEN Picnic (2mins)
    • Content due to Lynne August 15th
  • November General Meeting, November 14th (8 mins)
    • WE NEED TOPICS/SPEAKERS! Please email ideas to all Board members at or by the September 5th Board meeting. Decisions will be made at that meeting. General meeting agenda must be solidified by October 17th.
    • Newsletter content due (including General meeting topics/speakers) to Lynne October 17th; start thinking about article ideas now
  • BEAM BRIGHT Parade (October 14th)? (3 mins)
  • SEN Mailchimp: Get your Committee Reports to the Communications Committee (3 mins)

Adjourn

SEN Hybrid Board Meeting Agenda, 7pm July 11, 2023

Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St. & Zoom

Zoom Link:

https://us06web.zoom.us/j/88574713250

Call to Order

  • As a reminder, this meeting will be recorded, personal audio and video are permitted but only with prior disclosure to meeting attendees. Personal video and audio recordings may not be reproduced in any form without informed consent of the individuals represented ie: non-board members of the audience.
  • If a member of the online audience wishes to make public comment, please raise a hand.

Public Comment (5 mins)

Message from Co-Chair(s): (5 mins)

  • GoDaddy Update
    • Expired; renewed for five years; $164.50; paid for by the COE
  • Land Use Committee
    • Unless a Board member would like to take the lead, the Land Use Committee is officially dissolved due to lack of interest.

Consent Agenda (see additional documents) (<3 mins)

  1. Approve Past Meeting Minutes (see attached)
  2. Approve Lucy Bambrey as appointed Board member
  3. Approve ESC materials for digital distribution (see attached)

Treasurer’s Report: Christina/Dennis (see email report)

Committee Reports (see email reports unless otherwise noted below)

  • Disaster Preparedness -David Monk
  • Transportation Committee – Jess
  • Communications Committee/Website/FB – Dennis, Ela
  • Land Use Committee – Dennis
  • Tugman Park Volunteers – John
  • Environmental Stewardship Committee – Devon
  • NLC – Dennis
  • Picnic Committee – John/Jessica/Dennis

Old Business:

  • Next up rotating Co-chair: Gerry (<3mins)
  • ‘Safety Page’ website page update? – Gerry (5 mins)
  • Social Sign-Up (no one signed up for July…yet!)
    • Sign Up on the Google Drive with this link:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1iPXtsFngNzUiXCJg9S2k9d0ASfOjzBjtjjgzSELtp2U/edit

New Business:

  • SEN Mailchimp (5 mins)
  • Fall retreat planning volunteer? (one Board member is needed to work with Devon and Cindy Kohler)

Adjourn

 

Grow Your Own National Park

Steve Solteaz, SEN Resident

How would you like to do something good for the environment and see the result of your effort every day? A nascent but inspirational movement, Homegrown National Park, is promoting individual action to regenerate nature. The co-founder, Prof. Doug Tallamy, is a well-respected researcher who has been advocating for years habitat restoration in our yards. He has an engaging video on the Homegrown National Park web site (https://homegrownnationalpark.org/) that explains the urgency but also an encouraging path forward for all of us. Spoiler alert: planting native plants in our yards is a big part of the solution.

If you are jazzed after learning about Homegrown National Park or you already know you want to “do something” with your yard, the Xerces Society has good how-to informational resources (https://xerces.org/pollinator-resource-center). Don’t despair if you only have a small space; urban yards are especially good for restoration because homeowners can provide a scale of management not possible with large tracts of land. And if you don’t own a patch of land, volunteer with an organization in Eugene that is restoring habitat.

Make no mistake, nature is in crisis. Humanity has significantly degraded three quarters of earth’s land and is driving one million plant and animal species towards extinction (Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, 2019; United Nations Biodiversity Conference, 2022). However, each of us can take action to restore nature around our homes, and collectively we can regenerate the natural systems that sustain us and make life interesting.

If you have any questions or comments about regenerating nature at your home or volunteering to help restore habitat, send an email to manndevonsen@gmail.com.

 

Best Practices for Watering Your Landscape

Devon Mann, SEN Co-Chair & ESC Chair

No matter what kind of yard or landscape you have, it’s important to know exactly how much water your plants need before you turn on the sprinkler. Smart watering practices reduce runoff and may decrease the need for pesticides and fertilizers.

Residential outdoor water use in the United States accounts for nearly 8 billion gallons of water each day, mainly for landscape irrigation. Experts estimate that as much as 50 percent of this water is wasted due to overwatering caused by inefficiencies in irrigation methods and systems. Where possible in any landscape, consider laying a three-inch (3”) layer of mulch (e.g.: fine bark, leaf compost) to conserve moisture and reduce watering requirements.

Timing Is Everything

 

Do:

Water early in the morning when the air is cool, wind is low, and water pressure is higher on municipal systems.

This greatly reduces evaporation and allows plants to absorb water before the heat of the day thus also reducing plant stress. The leaves of plants will also have time to dry before nightfall which helps prevent fungal and bacterial infections as well as slug and snail predation.

Don’t:

Water in the heat of the day or the evening.

Roughly 50% of water used is lost to evaporation when the landscape is watered in the afternoon heat. Watering in the evening forces plants to experience the hot, dry and often windy conditions of the day without a drink since the evening before. In addition, moist leaves and soil overnight increase the risk of fungal and bacterial infections as well as consumption by pests like slugs and snails.

To Hose or Not to Hose: Water Application Methods Matter

 

Use an application rate that permits water to soak in rather than run off from the garden area. To avoid this, concentrate watering in the root zone. The less water applied between plants where the roots haven’t yet extended, the less water is lost to evaporation, and fewer weeds are likely to grow.

Hand-Watering is a comforting practice for many gardeners.

Unfortunately, it can deliver water faster than soils are able to absorb it, thereby causing wasteful runoff or deliver water only to the soil surface which rapidly evaporates.

Sprinklers can scatter water where it isn’t needed.

As with hand-watering, water is often delivered faster than it can soak into the soil.

A sprinkler leads to greater evaporation loss than other methods of watering, but you can minimize those losses by watering early during cooler, less windy times of day.

Low-Flow Irrigation Systems such as soaker hoses and drip can deliver moisture directly to the root zone at a uniform rate throughout the growing season, thereby promoting the best possible growth.

You can combine drip emitters, soaker tubing, and miniature sprayers and sprinklers for an effective and efficient watering system.

A properly functioning low-flow system avoids water wasted via runoff or evaporation. And because water is applied directly to the soil, leaf diseases are limited because leaves remain dry.

Frequently inspect irrigation systems and check for leaks and broken or clogged sprinkler heads. Don’t water pavement (it is not going to grow)! Repair/adjust sprinkler heads that are broken or spraying on the sidewalk, street, or driveway.

How Much is Enough?

Whatever watering methods you prefer, check the moisture content of the soil several hours after watering to determine the effectiveness of your efforts. Root zones of most plants should be moist to a depth of 12 to 15 inches.

Excessively wet ground is common whenever garden soil has a high clay content. Too much water in the soil prevents air from reaching roots, literally drowning them. Clay soils are slow to absorb or to give up water. So, even though you may need to use several on-off cycles to thoroughly moisten such soil, you can water relatively infrequently. Sandy soils allow water to run through quickly but will dry out rather rapidly. Loamy soils are somewhere in between.

Symptoms of Over-Watering:

Yellow or mottled leaves

Leaves turn pale green or yellow and then fall off

Plants grow poorly, and spindly stems flop

Symptoms of Under-Watering:

Yellow or mottled leaves

Leaves look dull, somewhat grayed, and lack a reflective quality

The lawn loses its luster, takes on a blue-green cast, and doesn’t spring back when walked on

Leaves wilt and don’t recover when watered, but sometimes tomatoes will wilt in the heat of a hot day; if the soil feels moist, wait until evening to see whether they recover; if not, water the plants

Leaves may drop–whenever a plant runs short of water, as at the beginning of a drought cycle, it sheds leaves to protect itself. Leaves often turn yellow before they drop.

Give this a try: place a few empty tuna cans around your lawn while you’re watering and measure how long it takes your sprinkler to fill them with a half inch of water. Then, try watering that amount of time twice a week, gauge how your landscape responds, and adjust based on weather conditions.

When in doubt, contact a Master Gardener!

https://extension.oregonstate.edu/mg/lane/have-gardening-question

Resources:

https://www.epa.gov/watersense/watering-tips

https://extension.oregonstate.edu/sites/default/files/documents/12281/wateringtips.pdf

SEN Hybrid Board Meeting Agenda, 7pm, Tuesday, June 6, 2023 

Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St. & Zoom 

Zoom Link: 

https://us06web.zoom.us/j/88574713250 

Call to Order 

  • •As a reminder, this meeting will be recorded, personal audio and video arepermitted but only with prior disclosure to meeting attendees. Personal videoand audio recordings may not be reproduced in any form without informedconsent of the individuals represented ie: non-board members of theaudience.
  • •If a member of the online audience wishes to make public comment, pleaseraise a hand.

Public Comment (5 mins) 

Message from Co-Chair: (5 mins) 

Consent Agenda (see additional documents) (<3 mins) 

1.Approve Past Meeting Minutes (as potentially amended)

2.Approve ESC informational item(s) for future digital distribution

3.Approve Transportation & Disaster Preparedness Committees’ letter tothe City regarding the pedestrian and car bridges crossing 30th avenue.

4.Approval of SEN funds for ordering Aerial Maps for the DisasterPreparedness Committee

Treasurer’s Report: Christina (see email report) 

Committee Reports (see email reports unless otherwise noted below) 

  • •Disaster Preparedness – David Monk
  • •Transportation Committee – Jess
  • •Communications Committee/Website/FB—Dennis, Ela
  • •Land Use Committee—Emily/Kristin
  • •Tugman Park Volunteers—John O
  • •Environmental Stewardship Committee—Devon
  • •NLC- Dennis

OECE Neighborhood Association Liaison Meet & Greet: Cindy Koehler (20 mins) 

Old Business: 

  • •Status of Meet & Greets (5 mins)oFun & Games Game Night Follow-Up?
  • oSeed Exchange Date?

New Business: 

    • •Establishment of Picnic CommitteeoChoose Picnic Date
    • •SEN Mailchimp (5 mins)

Adjourn

May 9 General Election Meeting Minutes 

Twenty nine people attended in-person & online. 

Official Vote Count: 

Lucy Bambrey 13 

Jessica Blaszczyk 18 winner 

John Dubin 4 

Dennis Hebert 23 

Ela Kubok 24 

Lynne Macdonald 23 

May 2, 2023 SEN Board Meeting Minutes 

Call to order: 7:00 pm at Hilyard Community Center and via Zoom 

Attending: Christina, Dennis, Devon, Emily, Gerry, John, Kristin, Lynne 

Absent: Ela, Jess 

Guests: 2 remotely 

Report from the Co-Chairs: 

Emily was acknowledged for her many years of service and dedication to the Board. 

Dennis reported that our contribution to the Nightingale improvement project came to $420.00. 

Devon requested that all committee chairs go to the City web site and sign up for newsletters and other information pertinent to their committees. 

Public Comment: None 

Approve April Meeting Minutes: Approved unanimously 

Treasurer’s report: 

US Bank: $786.82 

City allotment: $1587.87 

Old business: 

SEN Draft By-Laws approval: 

Gerry identified one correction to the By-Laws as written. Article 5 Section 3 should read Article 5 Section 4. Upon amending the Draft By-Laws per Gerry’s correction, it was moved, seconded and approved unanimously to adopt the new By-Laws. 

Meet and Greet schedule: 

Emily suggested that we have a plant/seed exchange at Tugman Park. Emily and John will organize an event for June 3 and Kristin will put together and email to let neighbors know. She will also set up a calendar for future Meet and Greets. Gerry will check with the Fun Again Game Store about hosting a SE Neighbor’s game night. 

New Business: 

Ready Southeast Request: 

David is working with the City to get 10 aerial maps of our neighborhood printed for the emergency boxes. He requested the use of SEN city funds to cover the cost of the maps. He will let us know the total cost when he hears from the City. 

Mailchimp: 

Christina will be preparing the next Mailchimp communication. Emily submitted an article from a veterinarian regarding a disease dogs and get at dog parks and requested that it be posted in the Mailchimp message and the next newsletter. 

May Election Meeting: 

Jess will create a Zoom ballot and Devon will make one for in=person voting. Kathryn Rohan will give a transportation talk while the ballots are being tallied. Devon and Dennis explained that we will need someone to be Co-Chair and someone to deal with our weekly emails and rune the Zoom equipment at meetings. The new board will be announced and confirmed by the attendees. 

Dennis will manage all NLC business, and announced that budget cuts will be made to SE neighbors. 

Committee Reports: 

Transportation Committee: 

There was much discussion and neighbor support at the May General Meeting for sidewalk improvements and attention to accessibility. Neighbor Joanne has suggested a day at the end of September to call attention to sidewalk accessibility for all. We have had the digital sign-up form for the sidewalk vegetation help open for the month of May. Volunteers only have so far signed up, with no one requesting assistance yet. June 10th is a possible day when volunteers can be dispatched, if the need arises. 

Neighbors have also used the public comment at the May General Meeting to speak about speeding on their street between Donald and Willamette. 

The grant-funded sidewalk implementation project on Hilyard near Tugman Park has been completed this month. Some neighbors had expressed concern about the bump-outs for right hand turns, and other neighbors expressed full support for the bump outs if they work to slow the speeding traffic. 

Other developments this month: 

-Committee member Linda Duggan met with Councilor Keating to discuss neighborhoodtransportation issues, and the Spring Boulevard Bridge in particular.

-Jess Roshak emailed city engineer Jenifer Willard to follow-up about obtaining acurrent list of other bridges and their priority on the to-be-replaced or repaired list. Noreply has been received as of report submission time.

-Lucy Bambrey has finalized its letter to the city regarding the Spring Boulevard bridgeseismic evaluation failure and is asking the SEN board to approve sending the letter atthe June 6 board meeting.

-The committee asked the Neighborhood Leadership Council to invite interested partiesto discuss the Spring Boulevard Bridge at its May Thursday meeting.

-The Transportation Committee is happy to see the implementation of the new 24 hourlibrary book return at Amazon Community Center, as it reduces the need for cross-towntransit and creates a more complete neighborhood.

Land Use Committee: 

We explored how we could help each other do projects involving land use. 

1.Kristin wanted to let the city know that it was unreasonable for home owners to pay$5000 for a rain garden if they expanded their structure by 1000 ft- especially if they hada big yard for run off.

We suggested going to a city council meeting where they permit public feedback aboutanything and also to talk to Matt Keating.

2.Alden wanted sidewalks to be installed on southern Willamette street so a personcould walk to Spencer’s Butte via ridgeline trail. We suggested talking to the assistantdirector of Move Eugene.

3. Emily was interested in protecting C2 areas in SEN neighborhood- areas bordering C1-commercial areas. Aiden sent her information on this topic. 

Tugman Park Volunteers: 

_We held three volunteer work events in May: 5/3, 5/17 & 5/31 

_May 3rd highlights: weeding of the plaque circle bed and adjacent areas in the park’s north end; trash pick-up park-wide 

_May 17th highlights: weeding of the picnic shelter and restroom area beds; trash pick-up park-wide; participation in the SEN Gardening Get-Together (social and plant/seed exchange) in the early afternoon at Tugman 

_May 31st highlights: weeding of the basketball court bed; finalization of plans/projects for the Springtime Spruce Up volunteer work event on Saturday, June 3rd from 10 am – 12 noon; assisted in the bark chip/mulch delivery from P&OS 

_Following the 5/31 work event, we met with Kelsey Irvine (P&OS) to discuss: 

o Removal of the dead Douglas Fir tree in the north end with hopeful retention of a snag for wildlife benefit. Kelsey agreed to move this request forward with pertinent P&OS (and possibly Urban Forestry) personnel, including arborist(s). 

o Status of our proposed Fawn Lily Rise (south slope of the park) native tree and shrub planting project with hopeful inclusion in the P&OS tree budget for late 2023. Kelsey is still working on getting approval for this proposal. 

o Status of our request to list our Tugman restoration work with the non-profit organization Homegrown National Park (https://homegrownnationalpark.org/). Kelsey has not yet initiated approval of this request but agreed to move this forward once she identifies the appropriate P&OS personnel. 

o Possibility of uncovering or installation of a water tap in the park’s north end in order to facilitate our watering efforts there for our newly planted native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses. This doesn’t appear possible for 2023 so we are planning to irrigate this portion of the park utilizing Amazon Creek with bucket brigades. 

o Initial thoughts as to how we Tuggers can contribute to any possible mitigation and restoration efforts at Tugman that may come about due to the demise of ash tree species from the Emerald Ash borer insect. This is a very complex issue but we all agreed to keep in contact and to further explore what can be done at Tugman, including the planting of other tree species in the near term to replace possibly affected ash trees. 

o The use of P&OS electric powered weed whackers for our 6/14 event whereby we plan to weed and water the young native oak trees along the Fawn Lily Rise trail. 

_Periodic watering of our native plant beds park-wide has started and will continue summer-long as needed. 

_Park Watch (https://www.eugene-or.gov/2411/Park-Watch—Report-A-Safety-Issue) request postings have been made recently regarding graffiti activity in the park’s north end. 

_In an effort to grow our volunteer ranks and to be even more productive in our efforts at Tugman, we are hosting a Springtime Spruce Up volunteer work event on Saturday, June 3rd from 10 am – 12 noon. Hopefully, we’ll get some new passionate volunteers to help us in our beautification and restoration endeavors at the park. A notification of this Saturday 6/3 volunteer work event has been included in our May SEN digital mailing and more recently on the SEN Facebook page. 

Our regularly scheduled bi-weekly Wednesday volunteer work events for June 2023 are: 6/14 & 6/28 (10:00 am – 12 noon). 

Adjourn: 7:53 pm 

Habitat for Nature 

Steve Soltesz, SEN Resident 

There is so much discouraging news about nature and so little we can do to directly make a difference. Well, here is something you can do to make a tangible difference: restore native habitat in your yard or on your piece of property. 

Scientists estimate we have significantly changed three quarters of earth’s land (Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, 2019). As a result, more than half a million land species may not survive because of insufficient habitat. Why care? Biodiversity is crucial for human well-being, whether providing the means to keep us alive or just giving us nature to enjoy. 

If habitat loss is such a big problem, we can work on the solution by transforming the pieces of the planet we are directly responsible for back to a more native habitat. Urban yards are especially good for restoration because homeowners can provide a scale of management not possible with large tracts of land. A yard in the city will not attract all the wildlife found in wildlands, but it can literally hum with invertebrates. Even a small space can be transformed from a sterile feeling place to a space chaotic with insects. 

Insects? They are not the cute and cuddly animals we generally think about saving from human excesses, but scientists are deeply concerned about declining insect populations and extinctions (Scientists’ Warning to Humanity on Insect Extinctions, Biological Conservation, 2020). As E. O. Wilson points out, “If all mankind were to disappear, the world would regenerate back to the rich state of equilibrium that existed ten thousand years ago. If insects were to vanish, the environment would collapse into chaos.” Basically, insects are essential to us. 

Bird enthusiasts know insects are essential for songbirds. Even seed-eating birds must feed their nestlings insects, especially high-fat caterpillars. Research shows birds may prefer to forage among native plants because native plants are a better source of caterpillars than exotic plants. (Native Plants Improve Breeding and Foraging Habitat for an Insectivorous Bird, Biological Conservation, 2017). So if you like birds, give them the habitat they want. 

Native plants are the foundation for valuable habitat. However, appropriate non-native plants can add ecological value, such as resources for pollinators, when 

incorporated into a yard designed for providing habitat. Unfortunately, many ornamental plants may look nice but provide few or no resources for wildlife, or worse they invade our natural areas displacing indigenous plants and further degrading native habitats. Homeowners who want to give nature a helping hand should primarily rely on native plants for their landscaping. And why not – many native plants are absolutely beautiful in color and form. 

Creating our individual landscapes to provide valuable habitat is restorative for the planet and us. A space bursting with life provides daily enjoyment and discoveries and a good place to relax. However, gardening for nature takes a different mindset than the landscaping we have become accustomed to. The Xerces Society can help in this regard with its excellent informational resources (https://xerces.org/pollinator-resource-center). Individually we can take action to restore nature around our homes; collectively we can enrich the natural environment of our community. 

Letter To the City of Eugene From the SEN Transportation & Disaster Preparedness Committees 

To: Jenifer Willer, City Engineer, Public Works Department, City of Eugene 

City Manager’s Office, City of Eugene 

Chief Mike Caven, Chief of Fire, City of Eugene 

Chief Skinner, former Chief of Fire 

Council Leadership, Randy Groves (Councilor & former Fire Chief), & Mayor Lucy Vinis 

Cc: Matt Keating, City Councilor, Ward 2 

The Southeast Neighbors (SEN) community association requests that the two bridges over East 30th Ave (between Hilyard and I-5) be given a priority timeline for retrofitting, replacement, or removal. The Spring Blvd bridge over East 30th Ave does not meet seismic guidelines. The pedestrian bridge at Camas Ridge Elementary over East 30th (between Potter St and University St) also does not meet seismic guidelines. 

East 30th Ave is a City of Eugene Emergency Ice/Snow Route Priority 1 route and would be the major route of egress from the Southeast neighborhood (and other neighborhoods as well). In the case of a seismic event, if one or both of these bridges were to collapse, the main emergency response and evacuation artery for Southeast Eugene could be subject to a double closure. Therefore, this portion of the city would lose one of its major emergency response, evacuation, and transportation routes. 

We are requesting that attention to these bridges be given prompt and priority attention and funding from the city of Eugene. 

SEN represents the approximately 13,500+ people who live within the boundaries of Southeast Eugene. The SEN Transportation Committee is tasked with addressing the challenges of transportation issues within the community, including mass transit, unsafe vehicle operation, bicyclist safety, and pedestrian safety, among others. As such, we have approached the City of Eugene to work on several issues that have been identified by the members of our community. One issue is the real possibility of a natural disaster, such as an earthquake or wildfire, requiring mass evacuation of entire portions of the city. 

While the City of Eugene has an Emergency Ice/Snow Route map, it has been stated that it is not really intended to be an evacuation route map. However, logically, in Southeast Eugene, the main evacuation routes to the south and east are: 

• East 30th Avenue (up to four lanes) (Priority 1 route) 

• Dillard Road (two lanes, steep grades, sharp curves) (Priority 1 route) 

• Fox Hollow Road (two lanes, steep grades) (Priority 2 route) 

• South Willamette Street (two lanes, moderate grades) (Priority 2 route) 

So, let us imagine a worst-case, but possible, scenario: a major earthquake during the summer. Trees and power lines block various egress routes. Natural gas lines break all over town, leading to multiple residential fires. The prevailing winds coming down the valley push the fires south down the Willamette St corridor cutting off any evacuation to the west. 

(Disregarding Chambers St as a Priority 1 route because it would involve driving across town to the west.) 

If the bridges over 30th Ave collapse onto the road below, the two-lane roads will have to serve as evacuation routes for all 13,500+ Southeast residents and perhaps others coming from neighborhoods to the north. Even if those routes were open (without downed trees and power lines), it would be difficult, if not impossible, to get everyone out and over the Ridgeline in time. Therefore, people in the neighborhood would need to use alternate routes to get to 30th Ave, thus, clogging neighborhood streets and causing even more gridlock. 

SEN conducts a twice-yearly disaster preparedness exercise known as Ready Southeast Emergency Simulation. The next one is scheduled for Sat May 20, 2023. We believe the citizens of our community deserve the City’s support in safety and emergency response. Therefore, we have several more questions for the City to help in our efforts: 

  • • What company(ies) does the City use as its emergency response contractor? Where are they located? What are projected response times to 30th Ave bridges (both)? 
  • • What is the emergency preparedness and evacuation plan for the City? Does the plan include removal of debris by helicopter? 
  • • If the City of Eugene Emergency Ice/Snow Route map is not really intended to be an evacuation route map, what are the disaster evacuation routes proposed by the City? 
  • • Does the City intend to conduct evacuation and response drills? (Similar to the wildland fire exercises conducted in Corvallis in June 2021 and May 2022.) If not, why not? 
  • • What percentage of time of designated City staff is dedicated to emergency preparedness and evacuation? 

SEN appreciates all the responses from the various City departments to our inquiries with regard to public safety and health of our beautiful corner of Eugene. While we realize many of our concerns are not restricted to Southeast Eugene, we look forward to continued collaboration with the City to seek solutions. Please contact us with any questions. 

Sincerely, 

SEN Executive Board (soeast.eug@gmail.com) 

SEN Transportation Committee (soeast.eug@gmail.com) 

SEN Ready Southeast (SEN Disaster Preparedness) Committee (seneighborsprepared@gmail.com) 

Southeast Neighbors Hybrid Election Meeting

Tuesday, May 9, 2023, 7pm 

Hilyard Community Center 2580 Hilyard St. 

& on zoom https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81664451785 

Call to Order & Welcome 

Public Comment (3 mins/comment) 

Introduction of Board Candidates (12 mins) 

Introduction to Online/In-Person Voting Process (<5 mins) 

  • Voting (10 mins) 
  • Voting Results (2 mins) 

SEN Board Enters Executive Session 

  • Officer Selection 

For the Public During the Executive Session: 

  • Catherine Rohan, Associate Transportation Planner, City of Eugene Move Eugene Presentation (15 mins) 
  • David Monk, Disaster Preparedness Ready Southeast Event May 20, 2023 (5 mins)

SEN Board Exits Executive Session 

  • Announcement of new board officers (<1min) 
  • Membership ratification of new board officers (<1 min) 

Adjourn 

SEN Hybrid Board Meeting Agenda, 7pm, May 2, 2023 

Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard St. & Zoom 

Join Zoom Meeting 

https://us06web.zoom.us/j/88574713250 

Call to Order 

  • As a reminder, this meeting will be recorded, personal audio and video arepermitted but only with prior disclosure to meeting attendees. Personal video and audio recordings may not be reproduced in any form without informed consent of the individuals represented ie: non-board members of the audience.
  • If a member of the online audience wishes to make public comment, pleaseraise a hand.

Public Comment (5 mins) 

Message from Co-Chairs: Request to Committee Chairs (5 mins) 

Consent Agenda (see additional documents) (<3 mins) 

1.Approve Past Meeting Minutes

2.Approve Final Draft By-Laws

3.Approve ESC informational items for digital distribution

Treasurer’s Report: Christina/Dennis (see email report) 

Committee Reports (see email reports unless otherwise noted below) 

  • Disaster Preparedness – David Monk
  • Transportation Committee – Jess
  • Communications Committee/Website/FB—Dennis, Ela
  • Land Use Committee—Emily/Kristen
  • Tugman Park Volunteers—John Ostrom
  • Environmental Stewardship Committee—Devon

Old Business: 

  • Meet ‘n Greet Location/Sign-Up Update? (5 mins)

New Business: 

  • SEN Mailchimp (5 mins)
  • Overview of May Election Meeting (15 mins)

Adjourn

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